South Africa in my Kitchen

South Africa in my Kitchen

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Last night was the big South African dinner.  What a great experience!  Not everything met with universal approval, and there were a couple of bumps in the cooking, but it was fun, and I learned a lot!

The Menu:

Bobotie
Chicken potjiekos
Cape Malay curry
Sweetcorn bake
Chakalaka
Yellow rice
Miele pap
Blatjang
Milk tart
Malva pudding

(All these recipes and some others I found in my research are on my Pinterest board for South Africa.)

The Cooking:

This was a LOT of food, kind of like preparing for Thanksgiving.  But I’ve gotten really good at Thanksgiving, so I went at it with the same kind of organizational plan as I do for that:  Make as much as I can as far ahead as I can.  I actually probably could have started a little sooner than I did, but it all worked out.

I started on Thursday with the blatjang, which is a kind of fruit chutney served with meat dishes.  Several of the recipes I’d looked at called for it as a side, so I figured I’d better have some.  The recipe said it made 2 1/2 quarts, which was way more than I needed, so I halved it.  The only liquid in it is apple cider vinegar, which you cook down like you would a jam.  The only problem with that is that as it evaporates, the whole house smells like vinegar.  A couple of times the kids came into the kitchen and winced from the smell.

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Dried apricots and raisins soaking in the vinegar overnight

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Almonds and spices added, ready for the long, slow cook.

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After an hour

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Another 45 minutes later and it’s ready!

Even after cooking that all down, it still made more than a quart.  I’m going to have to run it through the canner.  I filled a pint jar and 7 half pints, so yeah, lots more than I needed!  I had expected it to be sweet, like a mango chutney, but while it had some sweetness, it’s still very acid.

Friday night was the chakalaka and milk tart.  I love chakalaka.  Mostly because it means I get to say “chakalaka”. Which is an awesome word.  Everyone should eat this stuff just because of the name.  And because it tastes good.  It’s basically carrots, peppers and black beans, but it has great flavor and a really nice mouth feel.  Which sounds pretentious, but honestly it does.  We all liked it warm, although the recipe says to serve it warm or cold.  I served it cold for dinner, but I think I like it better warm.  You could eat it as is, or throw some cooked chicken or pork on it to make a nice meal.

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The milk tart didn’t go as well.  The initial recipe wasn’t well written, with no instructions on how long to boil the custard mixture or even if you should, and the sequence of instructions wasn’t clear.  But I trusted it as best I could and ended up with this:

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Ugh.  Maybe it will set up over night, thought I.  I made the custard sauce for the Malva pudding and went to bed, hoping.

It didn’t.  *sigh*  Into the trash it went, and I scrambled to find a new recipe.  Found a good one on Allrecipes and banged out the crusts before I went to PT.  I didn’t get back from that until 10:30, and then it was full bore cooking until dinner at 5.

First off I finished the tarts.  This filling thickened up nicely and made two beautiful, smooth pies:

20151024_113243Then I did the Malva pudding, figuring I could add the syrup just before dessert.  Which worked out pretty well.

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I was a little worried at how full the dish was that it might overflow.

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But it worked out just about perfect!

I figured I’d do the bobotie next, as it was kind of like a meatloaf, so I could put it together and stick it in the fridge until it went in the oven.

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All the yummy bits

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All mixed together

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And in the casserole.

Oh yeah, that was a good choice.  All the lovely smells of onions and curry and turmeric were starting to fill the house.  Hero helped me with the knife work on this part until she forgot the difference between sliced and chopped.  Honestly, what do they teach kids in culinary school these days? 😉

So that went in the fridge while I made the pap.  I figured I could make that ahead and keep it in the crockpot on warm until dinner.

20151024_171217I don’t think I made it right.  It came out as more like a really dense dough than a polenta, and it was still really grainy, even though I added more water.  I think this is one of those situations you need to have had the real thing to know if you did it right.

The sweetcorn bake took no time to throw together and in the oven, although I was reminded again of the fact that I cannot cream butter by hand.  Thank you, Kitchenaid mixer!  Put that in the oven, set the time, then figured I’d do a clean up before the final push.  Loaded the dishwasher, wiped counters, pulled the plug to move the mixer back…and pulled the entire powerstrip out of the wall.  Which was fine, I just plugged it back in, completely forgetting that the microwave that had just been reset had had the timer for the sweetcorn bake.  Which I’d forgotten was in the oven.

Next up was the curry, as that had the longest cooking time.  Another round of sauteeing onions and garlic, veggies, meat, then adding in the tomatoes, fruit and spices.  Oh. My. God.  Before it had even had its stewing time, I wanted to crawl into the pot of this stuff and never come out.

20151024_152852Yes, you’re seeing right, those are banana slices in there.  And apricots, raisins, almonds, carrots, ginger, curry, turmeric, cardamom… Foodgasm doesn’t even come close.  I had been excited about this recipe even before this just because it seemed to have all the flavors of Indian food that I love without the heat that I can’t cope with.  But honestly?  You can’t really compare this two.  They’re just totally different creatures that share genes.  Very, very good genes.

That had to simmer for a couple of hours, so I put the bobotie in the oven…and found the sweetcorn bake.  Just in time!  It was perfectly done, despite my inattention, and looked yummy!

20151024_171331Then it was back to slicing up veggies for the potjiekos.  Potjiekos is Afrikaans for “little pots”, and basically it is a layered dish intended to be cooked in a cast iron pot over a fire.  For this one, we sauteed onions, garlic and chicken, then layered on potatoes, sweet potato, squash, carrots, green beans and mushrooms, then added cinnamon stick, bay leaves and pepper, put the lid on it and forgot about it.  On purpose this time.

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The recipe specifically says not to stir it, so I didn’t.  Much.  I just couldn’t see how the seasoning was going to get through everything!

Last up was the yellow rice, which, once you get it in the pot, is pretty hands off.

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From there I added the custard to the top of the bobotie and started laying out the table.

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Most of the custard slid down the sides, dang it!

 

The Dinner

 

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None of the adults I’d invited aside from Nikki were able to come, but most of Hero’s friends were there.  Have you tried feeding new foods to teenagers?  But I have to give them points for trying.  They all liked the potjiekos best, probably because it was a) chicken and 2) the least seasoned of everything.  To my surprise, they liked it with the pap, so maybe I didn’t go entirely wrong there.  My favorite was the curry with the yellow rice.  I was disappointed in the bobotie, which I had expected to really like.  But the flavor of the lamb just overwhelmed everything else in the dish.  the blatjang helped a little, but it wasn’t my favorite.  But that’s okay, because Morgan really liked it and wasn’t crazy about the curry.  Balance!

We had the main courses, then took a break to clean up a bit while I put the finishing touches on dessert.  Which I completely forgot to take pictures of.  Doh.  The milk tart was nice and refreshing, not too sweet.  Nikki and I agreed it would be really good with some fresh fruit or compote, or a nice sweet wine.  The Malva pudding was the opposite end of the spectrum, almost too sweet!  It’s like a dense bread pudding soaked in simple syrup.  It really needed the custard to cut the sugary sweetness, but it was still really good.  I think both of those are being added to the recipe collection.

The Aftermath

As I expected, there was a lot of food left over.  I had prepared by getting take out boxes from the dollar store, and packed up samplers for the folks who couldn’t make it.  The curry I packed up in single(ish) meal containers for me to take to work, and did the same with the bobotie for Morgan to have for his lunches.  The potjiekos I split into two containers to be the meat and veg base for a couple of last minute soups.  So not much went to waste.  Except the pap.

So all in all, a good experiment.  I’m looking forward to the next one!  The mother of one of Hero’s friends is Colombian and has offered to send us some dishes if we do a Colombian night, and I’m not about to say no to that.  Apparently she makes amazing cicerones.  But it will be a couple of months.  Next month I’m cooking actual Thanksgiving, so I’m not putting myself through two major meals in a month.  I think I’m going to take them out to a Japanese hibachi place instead.  It’s a kind of cooking I can’t do myself, and while they’ve had sushi, they haven’t had other kinds of Japanese food.  December will be crazy with getting ready for the holidays, so I thought we’d to something Scandinavian (cuz you know, that’s where Santa comes from), so I’m thinking fondue.  We do a home fondue for New Year’s Eve, but this way the kids can see just how bad I do at it!

So, farewell from South Africa!  I’ll report back with our next destination!  And if you have any questions about what we ate or how I made it, let me know!